Do Not Mistake Mental Ability for Spiritual Maturity

Ever since I was little, I have had a very easy time memorizing things. During Sunday school, this meant that I always knew the right answer, and was often the one to raise my hand and share it. And in Sunday school, knowing the right answer can seem an awful lot like being a spiritual elite.

I was also always able to read on a grade level that was above my actual age. As a result, I enjoyed reading from the Bible during Bible classes. I often volunteered to do so, while other children, who struggled with reading and often needed to take long pauses to sound out words did not volunteer very often to read for the class. And as we all know, volunteering to read in class is a mark of spiritual maturity, right? At least, it felt that way.

I also had a general knack for public speaking. I was hardly nervous even the first time that I appeared before a large group to deliver a devotional. I am strong at thinking on my feet, and could speak articulately with minimal notes. And as we all know, a young man who excels as speaking is spiritually mature, right? And public prayer is public speaking, too, so of course I was always ready to volunteer for that, as well.

I got a perfect score at Bible bowl. After that, I was the standard that others were encouraged to emulate. “He has such a love for God’s Word!”

I made good grades at a Christian university, too. Excelling at a “Christian college” is spiritual, right?

But these accomplishments, as much as they have to do with memorization, reading ability, articulating thoughts verbally, etc., have virtually nothing to do with spiritual maturity. Reciting facts from a book, or dictating a book aloud, are mental skills, not spiritual ones. Repeating sound doctrine is important. But LIVING sound doctrine is what really counts, and I have never been an expert at that.

I share all of this for a couple of reasons.

One reason is that I wonder how many young people who are average or below average in their ability to read aloud, or memorize facts, or speak publically, have been wrongly made to feel spiritually inferior. What a shame, to turn someone off to the church for reasons like those.

But another reason is because all of that praise about how much I loved God’s word, and how well I spoke and how I was such a leader in the youth group, etc.; it kind of sunk in. And because of that, I kind of did feel like I was spiritually mature. And that blinded me from my own spiritual brokenness. But we must all realize our own brokenness before we can appreciate Chris’s sacrifice for us, and before we can understand the narrow way that He now calls us to follow.

Whether you feel like you are “smart” or “dumb” by worldly intellectual standards, do you know God? Do you talk to Him? Do you listen to Him? Do you obey Him? Do you trust Him when things get tough? Will you follow Him anywhere? Will you step out of your comfort zone? Will you confess your sins to your brothers and sisters? Are you spreading the gospel? Do you even believe the gospel? Are you a doer of the word, rather than a reciter of it? Are you doing what is in the best interest of your family, of your church, and of the lost, or are you serving yourself first and foremost?

These are the questions I am convinced we need to be asking. Not how well we perform on academic exercises.

I will leave you with a final teaching from the mouth of Jesus in Matthew 21:

“‘But what do you think? A man had two sons, and he came to the first and said, “Son, go work today in the vineyard.” And he answered, “I will not”; but afterward he regretted it and went. The man came to the second and said the same thing; and he answered, “I will, sir”; but he did not go. Which of the two did the will of his father?’ They said, ‘The first.’ Jesus said to them, ‘Truly I say to you that the tax collectors and prostitutes will get into the kingdom of God before you.'”

Biblical Manhood

Society has its own ideas of what makes a man. But the Bible paints its own beautiful, powerful picture of what manhood should look like.

Society teaches that a man is someone who gets whatever he wants. He is surrounded by beautiful women, nice cars, and big screen TV’s. Jesus, however, the only perfect man to ever live, didn’t even get married or have a girlfriend, and he acquired almost no personal possessions. Instead, He was busy pouring Himself out for a broken world, speaking powerfully about His Father, and spending time alone in the wilderness.

The Bible contains a great deal of information about manhood. Maybe you did not have a father figure in your life, or maybe he was not a very good example. Even if you have a great father, painting a Biblical picture of manhood can help us understand even more clearly what God’s intentions are for men.

Men are:
Morally disciplined and upstanding. “Be strong, and show yourself a man, and keep the charge of the Lord your God, walking in his ways and keeping his statutes, his commandments, his rules, and his testimonies.” (2 Kings 2:2)

Calculated in their actions.
“A wise man is full of strength, and a man of knowledge enhances his might, for by wise guidance you can wage your war, and in abundance of counselors there is victory.” -Proverbs 24:5-6

Concerned with the spiritual welfare of themselves and others.
“Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. Let all that you do be done in love.” – 1 Corinthians 16:13-14

Gentle and kind.
“Likewise, husbands, live with your wives in an understanding way, showing honor to the woman as the weaker vessel, since they are heirs with you of the grace of life, so that your prayers may not be hindered.” – 1 Peter 3:7

Concerned with things of importance.
“When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I gave up childish ways.” – 1 Corinthians 13:11

Mature.
“Brothers, do not be children in your thinking. Be infants in evil, but in your thinking be mature.” -1 Corinthians 14:20

Hard working.
“It is good for a man that he bear the yoke in his youth.” – Lamentations 3:27

If we are tempted to think that Biblical men are emasculated, devoid of any real adventure or danger or passion, we need only look to the examples of Godly men in the Bible to find otherwise. What could be more adventurous than Paul’s ancient travels around the world, with the threat of death at every turn? What could be more dangerous that David’s rise to power, starting with a band of 400 thugs and ending in the uniting of the kingdom of Israel? What could be more passionate than the power with which Jesus gave His life up for us on a crucifix, knowing well that He could strike us all dead if He so desired?

Let us aspire to hold up God’s picture of manhood.

Statue of a Man