The Masterpiece (Romans 1:20) – Austin Gonzales

At last, the Artist had finished laboring. He took a step back and surveyed His work. Completely satisfied, He said, “It is very good,” then He rested for a day (Gen. 1:31-2:2). Within this masterpiece are many smaller works – each one a masterpiece in its own right. I am one of those privileged to observe some of these every day, as the Artist
continually touches-up and cares for them. Some of my favorites are “Water,” “Flora and Fauna,” “Sky,”

“Chemistry,” and “Music.” “Chemistry” is the medium that the Artist uses to mold his masterpiece. Within “Chemistry,” I consider Elements, which struggle together as small teams cooperating and building upon each other to construct the entirety of the vast masterpiece, as the Artist directs (1 Cor. 12:12-31). I also observe Fire, which He uses to refine various parts of His masterpiece – eradicating great stains and smears through much toil and patience, as well as strengthening the mold (1 Pet. 1:6-7).

“Flora and Fauna” illustrates the delicacy of the masterpiece. From this we can see how such art owes its existence to its Creator and to the Person who preserves it and cares for it. It is a beautiful creation – filled with untold complexity and variety that give us just a taste of how intelligent and wise the Maker of this masterpiece must be (Rom. 11:33-36). Moreover; through examining the intricacies of the relationships between “Flora and Fauna” set pieces, we discover amazing jewels like care and protection (Matt. 6:25-34).

“Sky” makes use of the Artist’s full palette of colors, patterns, and lighting. The dominant feature – Weather – is a constantly changing canvas. Weather portrays, at times, immense power. At other times it portrays peace, or anything else in-between (Mark 4:35-41). Another feature is Sunrise, sometimes called Sunset. Sunrise is a live exhibition portraying the Artist’s emotions in color. This fascinating display of emotion continually changes as each moment passes. But even when it disappears from view, it’s still there – bleeding, growing, mourning, smiling. Though many parts of the masterpiece fade away after a time, Sunrise never ceases to be. It is at the Beginning and, as Sunset, it is at the End of the masterpiece (Rev. 22:13).

“Water” is the shading technique that connects all of these masterpieces to each other in a pure hue. It sometimes acts as an eraser – cleansing and shaping the foundations for the masterpiece. At other times, it gives life to the masterpiece (John 3:5; 4:13-14): “Sky,” “Chemistry,” and especially “Flora and Fauna,” could not be what they are without “Water”, and wherever “Water” is not, there is instead a blemishing agent called Death.

“For the invisible things of him, that is, his eternal power and Godhead, are seen by the creation of the world, being considered in his works, to the intent that they [men] should be without excuse:” (1599 Geneva Bible) (Brackets added for clarification, based on context)

Art is a way of expressing oneself. The Artist desired to express Himself – His personality – to His masterpiece. So through art, as well, we can see the personality of this master Artist displayed. Through music, we can see harmony – the idea of multiple parts working together as a whole – much like Elements. Through smithing and pottery, we can see His method of refining and strengthening through toil and pain – much like Fire. Through score composition and architecture, we can learn about the mathematics, complexities, and other such evidences of this Artist’s intelligence – much like “Flora and Fauna.” By studying colors, patterns, and lighting – as seen in “Sky,” we can learn a great deal about sin and righteousness (1 John 1:5-10), and about human emotion, a gift bestowed by the Artist upon His portrait “The Likeness of His Image” (Gen. 1:26-27).

Even in the use of our cleaning materials when the work is done we can observe the pure, cleansing nature of the Artist – like that of “Water.” We can observe how they may be used to both erase and create, to make the artwork exactly what the Artist wants (2 Cor. 5:21). Even more; we can observe how, without the proper cleansing Agent, the art may remain blemished or covered up, but never restored – much like those marked by sin, for Death. The Artist can only use the proper cleansing Agent to restore that precious gift of Life to His portrait and make it again, truly, “The Likeness of His Image” (John 14:6).

A Story About a Sheep

When Nathan came to David as recorded in 2 Samuel 12, he came to a man guilty of lust, adultery, reckless endangerment, and murder. And yet David seemed totally oblivious to any of this. For your convenience, here is an overview of David’s recent actions, for which he showed no sign of guilt:

  • David stayed home when he should have been out protecting his people (2 Samuel 11:1).
  • He saw a woman bathing, and decided to sleep with here even after being informed that she was his friend’s wife. (3-4).
  • When she became pregnant, David tried to cover it up, but it did not work because of his friend’s own sense of duty and honor (5-13).
  • Ultimately David staged his friend’s death, sending the plan of action in his friend’s own hands. (14-17)
  • David put countless others in mortal danger in the process, all the while making it look like an accident (18-25).
  • David then saw fit to take this woman to be his wife (26-27).

The incredible thing about David’s state of mind after all of this, is that a made up story about one man butchering another man’s sheep enraged him enough to pronounce: “As the Lord lives, surely the man who has done this deserves to die (2 Samuel 12:5).”

Adultery and murder were one thing, but the idea that a poor man’s beloved sheep might be butchered and eaten by his neighbor was simply too much to bear. In this way, I believe our society is a lot like David was in 2 Samuel 12.

Every day we legally put an end to thousands of precious human lives in their mother’s wombs, and millions of people see no problem with this. On the other hand, a U.S. felony conviction for “possession, sale, purchase, barter, offer to sell, purchase or barter, transport, export or import, of any bald or golden eagle, alive or dead, including any part, nest, or egg,” will result in a fine of up to $250,000 or two years in prison.

The law protects an eagle’s egg, but not an unborn child. What rationale could possibly justify this discrepancy?

Someone might suggest that it is important to protect the eagle because it is endangered, while humans are not. This is to suggest that the worth of a human life is inversely proportional to how many humans are currently alive. Surely human worth and dignity are not determined by “how many of us there are.”

Or maybe the eagle is important to the ongoing health of our ecosystem, while another human is not. This is to suggest that a human’s worth is based on their utilitarian value. Have we really come to believe that if a human is not really necessary to the preservation of our own comfort, then they no longer have any worth? Do we really want to live in a world where people only dignify each others’ existence to the degree that they find it personally useful?

Of course, eagles are only one example among thousands that reflect our cultural understanding of the worth and dignity of animals. Just as abortion is only one way among many that we undermine the much greater worth and dignity invested in human beings. What an incredible state we find ourselves in when we are willing to treat human lives in a way that evokes our outrage when applied to animals.

Yes, it is natural to feel affection for cute, fury creatures. And yes, it is right to go to great lengths to preserve the pristine dignity and beauty of God’s natural creation. But do not neglect your fellow man, woman, or child, born or unborn, “useful” or “not useful,” in the process. He or she was made in the image of God.

For the record, the story about the sheep brought David to his senses. Will we come to ours?

Ewe Lamb