A Story About a Sheep

When Nathan came to David as recorded in 2 Samuel 12, he came to a man guilty of lust, adultery, reckless endangerment, and murder. And yet David seemed totally oblivious to any of this. For your convenience, here is an overview of David’s recent actions, for which he showed no sign of guilt:

  • David stayed home when he should have been out protecting his people (2 Samuel 11:1).
  • He saw a woman bathing, and decided to sleep with here even after being informed that she was his friend’s wife. (3-4).
  • When she became pregnant, David tried to cover it up, but it did not work because of his friend’s own sense of duty and honor (5-13).
  • Ultimately David staged his friend’s death, sending the plan of action in his friend’s own hands. (14-17)
  • David put countless others in mortal danger in the process, all the while making it look like an accident (18-25).
  • David then saw fit to take this woman to be his wife (26-27).

The incredible thing about David’s state of mind after all of this, is that a made up story about one man butchering another man’s sheep enraged him enough to pronounce: “As the Lord lives, surely the man who has done this deserves to die (2 Samuel 12:5).”

Adultery and murder were one thing, but the idea that a poor man’s beloved sheep might be butchered and eaten by his neighbor was simply too much to bear. In this way, I believe our society is a lot like David was in 2 Samuel 12.

Every day we legally put an end to thousands of precious human lives in their mother’s wombs, and millions of people see no problem with this. On the other hand, a U.S. felony conviction for “possession, sale, purchase, barter, offer to sell, purchase or barter, transport, export or import, of any bald or golden eagle, alive or dead, including any part, nest, or egg,” will result in a fine of up to $250,000 or two years in prison.

The law protects an eagle’s egg, but not an unborn child. What rationale could possibly justify this discrepancy?

Someone might suggest that it is important to protect the eagle because it is endangered, while humans are not. This is to suggest that the worth of a human life is inversely proportional to how many humans are currently alive. Surely human worth and dignity are not determined by “how many of us there are.”

Or maybe the eagle is important to the ongoing health of our ecosystem, while another human is not. This is to suggest that a human’s worth is based on their utilitarian value. Have we really come to believe that if a human is not really necessary to the preservation of our own comfort, then they no longer have any worth? Do we really want to live in a world where people only dignify each others’ existence to the degree that they find it personally useful?

Of course, eagles are only one example among thousands that reflect our cultural understanding of the worth and dignity of animals. Just as abortion is only one way among many that we undermine the much greater worth and dignity invested in human beings. What an incredible state we find ourselves in when we are willing to treat human lives in a way that evokes our outrage when applied to animals.

Yes, it is natural to feel affection for cute, fury creatures. And yes, it is right to go to great lengths to preserve the pristine dignity and beauty of God’s natural creation. But do not neglect your fellow man, woman, or child, born or unborn, “useful” or “not useful,” in the process. He or she was made in the image of God.

For the record, the story about the sheep brought David to his senses. Will we come to ours?

Ewe Lamb

Make Me White as Snow

The gospel is a message of good news for all people, and as a result, much of God’s word is written in such a way that the common man can easily understand it.  The Bible is full of illustrations that are drawn from everyday life experiences that we can relate to.  As winter arrives and a snow blankets the ground, I am reminded of one of those illustrations.

In Isaiah 1:18, God invited His people to come back to Him:

“Come now, and let us reason together,
Says the Lord,
Though your sins are as scarlet,
They will be as white as snow.”

David echoed this concept in Psalm 51, when he begged the LORD for forgiveness after committing both adultery and murder.

“Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean;
Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.”

There is something beautiful about looking out across a field that is covered in a blanket of clean, glistening snow.  The flawless white surface conveys simplicity, peace, and above all, purity.  Sometimes we almost hesitate to walk through the yard because we hate to mess up the surface, leaving evidence of our presence with the imperfections we leave behind.

And of course, once snow is made dirty, it is impossible to make it look perfect again.  Once dirt, grime, and sludge from city life have turned it black, or we traipse across that pristine field with muddy shoes, there is no going back.

This is an excellent example of what sin does to our lives.  When we look back at our lives we see dirt, mud, grime, and sludge being tracked all over what started out so perfect.

What God offers us through His Son in the gospel seems almost too good to be true.  He offers to restore that pure white, glistening field to its original condition.  Though our sins are as scarlet, He is willing to make them as white as snow again.  In fact, according to David, He will make us even whiter than snow could ever be.

This is what has been referred to as the scandal of Grace.  This is the outrageous and wonderful nature of our forgiveness.  This is why it is called the gospel, or literally, the good news.  “He made Him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf, so that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.” (2 Corinthians 5:21)

He did what we could never have hoped to do in making us as white as snow once more.  The purity that belongs to Jesus Christ Himself is imputed to us, and day by day we are being transformed into His image.

Snow